Blog


Towards multi-modal causability with Graph Neural Networks enabling information fusion for explainable AI

gnn.png

Title: Towards multi-modal causability with Graph Neural Networks enabling information fusion for explainable AI
Authors: Holzinger Andreas, Malle Bernd, Saranti Anna, Pfeifer Bastian. (2021)
Journal: Information Fusion
Publisher: Elsevier

The authors describe a novel, holistic approach to an automated medical decision pipeline, building on state-of-the-art Machine Learning research, yet integrating the human-in-the-loop via an innovative, interactive & exploration-based explainability technique called counterfactual graphs. They outline the necessity of computing a joint multi-modal representation space in a decentralized fashion, for the reasons of scalability and performance as well as ever-evolving data protection regulations. This effort is indented as a motivation for the international research community and a launchpad for further work in the fields of multi-modal embeddings, interactive explainability, counterfactuals, causability, as well as necessary foundations for effective future human–AI interfaces.

More: https://featurecloud.eu/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Holzinger-et-al_2021_Towards-multi-model-causability.pdf

Sustainable computational science: the ReScience initiative

ReScience-banner-500.png

Title: Sustainable computational science: the ReScience initiative
Authors: Nicolas Rougier,  Hinsen Konrad and others
Journal: PeerJ Computer Science
Publisher: PeerJ Inc.

Computer science offers a large set of tools for prototyping, writing, running, testing, validating, sharing and reproducing results; however, computational science lags behind. In the best case, authors may provide their source code as a compressed archive and they may feel confident their research is reproducible. But this is not exactly true.
James Buckheit and David Donoho proposed more than two decades ago that an article about computational results is advertising, not scholarship. The actual scholarship is the full software environment, code, and data that produced the result. This implies new workflows, in particular in peer-reviews.  Existing journals have been slow to adapt: source codes are rarely requested and are hardly ever actually executed to check that they produce the results advertised in the article.
ReScience is a peer-reviewed journal that targets computational research and encourages the explicit replication of already published research, promoting new and open-source implementations in order to ensure that the original research can be replicated from its description. To achieve this goal, the whole publishing chain is radically different from other traditional scientific journals. ReScience resides on GitHub where each new implementation of a computational study is made available together with comments, explanations, and software tests.

More: https://www.labri.fr/perso/nrougier/papers/10.7717.peerj-cs.142.pdf

Open Research Webinar

DCR_PDP4E.jpg

Open Research Webinars is a new webinar series launched by OW2 and the Eclipse Foundation in December 2020. The aim is to introduce european software research projects that help shape the future of open source software and the IT industry. The webinars will focus on international partners leveraging open source in European publicly-funded collaborative research and innovation programs.

  • Virgile Prevosto (CEA List) presents the H2020 DECODER Project March 4 at 16:15 CET. 
  • Antonio Kung (Trialog) and Yod Samuel Martín (UPM) present the H2020 PDP4E project at 16:35 CET.

More information about the Open Research Webinars: https://opensourceinnovation.eu/
Replay the DECODER webinar video

Hardware Versus Software Fault Injection of Modern Undervolted SRAMs

SRAM_FI.jpg

Researchers from Barcelona Supercomputing Center (Spain) and Abdullah Gul University in Kayseri (Turkey) are sharing an approach to apply real under-volting SRAM fault maps to a simulated system and observe the resiliency of the applications.
They compare the hardware guided fault injection approach with a random guided fault injection approach. Significant differences appears in the coarse categorization of the resiliency of the application, which become more obvious as the number of faulty bits increases. There are also differences when inspecting the quality of the output among the two techniques. This is because in an realisticsystem  not all fault locations have the same probability to  present faults, therefore from the software  perspective the faults can propagate to a limited number of software structures.

More

Corrective Commit Probability Code Quality Metric

CCP.jpg

An article signed by Idan Amit and Dror G. Feitelson from the Department of Computer Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, presents a code quality metric, the Corrective Commit Probability (CCP).

This metric measures the probability that a commit reflects corrective maintenance. The authors think that this metric agrees with developers’ concept of quality, informative, and stable. Corrective commits are identified by applying a linguistic model to the commit messages. The  team compute the CCP of all large active GitHub projects (7,557 projects with 200+ com-mits in 2019). This leads to the creation of a quality scale, suggesting that the bottom 10% of quality projects spend at least 6 times more effort on fixing bugs than the top 10%. Analysis of project attributes shows that lower CCP (higher quality) is associated with smaller files, lower coupling, use of languages like JavaScript and C# as opposed to PHP and C++, fewer developers, lower developer churn, better on boarding, and  better  productivity. Among  other  things these results support the “Quality is Free” claim, and suggest that achieving higher quality need not require higher expenses.

Fosdem 2021 : DECODER is showcased on OW2 virtual booth

Fosdem2021.png

The DECODER project team is participating in FOSDEM 2021, an online-only edition this year. OW2 Management Office team members and project members remain available throughout the weekend to answer questions from connected decision makers, IT professionals and open source developers.

  • Please, join the OW2 virtual booth at your convenience, from home. No registration required.
  • The OW2 virtual booth received around 20 attendees during this FOSDEM edition, mainly software developers. 

More

DECODER Platform Workflow


This OW2 animation illustrates how the DECODER platform is processing java project code to extract and store new software knowledge. To integrate your own tool to the platform, please read:

MongoDB, A Database For Document Stores

MongoDB_logo.jpg

A potential prey for Oracle or Microsoft, MongoDB leads the document store market, and is now ranked #5 among all DBMS (source: DB Engines). It is at the heart of the DECODER PKM and also of multiple one-page websites based on the MEAN stack (Angular, MongoDB, Express, NodeJS).

In a recent article, Eric Weiss, Analyst at several large banks, sees MongoDB as the clear-cut leader within the high-growth, non-relational database SaaS sector. "MongoDB has been and will continue to be an indirect beneficiary of high-growth megatrends such as AI, Machine Learning, IoT (Internet-of-the-Things) and digitalization. Each of these trends have sparked an exponential growth in supply of unstructured data resulting in an increasing demand for (NoSQL) non-relational database solutions. Such databases can much more efficiently handle this new flow of data workloads compared to more traditional relational, SQL-based solutions".

Digital Engineering Club, Systematic

Systematic-Logo.png

Date: 6/1/2021
Online Workshop
Organizer: Systematic Paris Area

During this System and Software Engineering Workshop organised by Systematic Paris Area, Virgile Prevosto (CEA, List) presents DECODER as an intelligent software platform that mixes semi-formal and formal approaches to help developers deliver quality software.

Created in 2005, Systematic, the European Deep Tech Cluster, has brought together and animated a community of nearly 900 members, including nearly 600 start-ups, SMEs and medium-sized enterprises, 140 large groups, 140 academics, a college of investors and a college of about twenty local authorities.

More

Big Code has a direct impact on the business outcomes

bigcode_dep.png

For developers, code releases are "emotional" events. Many have fear and anxiety at the moment they release code or submit it for review and fear breaking dependencies.

Indeed, managing large and complex code bases (Big Code) can become laborious, time consuming and costly. Joe McKendrick article refers to a 2020 survey of 500 north American professional developers compiled by Dimensional Data and underwritten by Sourcegraph. The Emergence of Big Code survey highlights a dramatic growth in the volume and complexity of software code.

It's almost unanimous: 99% of respondents report that big code has a direct impact on the business outcomes of software development efforts. Challenges include less time for new hires to be productive (62%), code breaking due to a lack of understanding of dependencies (57%), and difficulties managing changes to code (50%).

Read the full article in ZDnet: https://www.zdnet.com/article/low-and-no-code-are-wonderful-but-a-big-code-world-lurks-underneath/

..
Site maintained by OW2